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Swing Tuner

Swing Tuner

Swing Tuner

Swing Tuner

Swing Tuner

Swing Tuner

Swing Tuner

Delayed Hand Release




Delayed Hand Release

The technique of the delayed hand release to increase golf swing speed is not clearly understood by many golfers. Yet, it is the most effective technique for adding more distance to your game. By delayed hand release, I mean keeping your hands in a fully cocked position during the downswing for as long as possible before releasing them through the ball.

Swing Speed and Trunk Turn Speed

Swing speed refers to the speed at which the club head is traveling as it strikes the ball. The faster the club head swing speed, the further you are able to hit the ball. The swing speed of the club head at impact depends on how quickly you are able to accelerate your downswing turn from the top of your backswing where the swing speed is ZERO, to the point of impact with the ball.

Golf Physics


Force = Mass x Acceleration.

This equation applies to all objects moving in a straight line. The golf swing though, rotates in a circular path and the equivalent equation that applies to objects moving in a circle is:

Torque = Moment of Inertia x Angular Acceleration

The goal is to increase your angular acceleration during the downturn to increase your golf swing speed. This equation indicates you have two options for achieving this:

Increase the Torque of the swing, which requires additional physical effort, or reduce the Moment of Inertia of the swing, which requires no physical effort.

Mechanics of the Downswing

The common understanding of all golfers on how to increase the rate of acceleration of the swing is to increase the torque built up during their backswing. However, as you can see from the equation above, the Moment of Inertia of the swing also determines how fast you can accelerate the downswing. A smaller MOI for a given torque will result in a faster rate of acceleration on the downswing. Moment of Inertia (MOI) Moment of Inertia defines the inertia of a mass that is rotating and is a function of both the size of the mass that is rotating and the radius the mass is rotating away from it's axis of rotation. The larger the radius of rotation for a given mass will result in a larger MOI, or inertia of the mass. As the term inertia implies, the larger the inertia, the more difficult it is to get the object started from a stand still position. MOI applies to a golf swing because the swing is a rotating entity. Your goal on the downswing is to keep the MOI of your swing as low as possible to make it easier to start the swing and achieve a faster rate of downswing acceleration with the torque you have built up on your backswing.

How to Reduce Swing MOI

There is nothing you can do to affect the mass of the swing since that is fixed by the weight of your arms, the club shaft and the club head. However, you have a lot of control over the swing radius of the rotation, controlled by your hand technique. The swing radius being the distance from the tip of the club head to the center of your spine in your shoulder area, around which the swing is turning. Determined by the angle at which you cock your hands. The more you cock your hands, the smaller you make the swing radius. You want the swing radius to be as small as possible at the start of the downswing by maintaining the fully cocked position of the hands as much as possible for as long as possible. This makes it easier for the torque you have generated during the backswing to get the swing under way and accelerate the swing at a faster rate on the downswing. The problem for many golfers shortly after this point is that they begin the release of the hands on the downswing too early.

Early Hand Release

As you begin to release the hands, you increase the swing radius, and by doing so you increase the swing MOI. The turn rate of your trunk slows down as you increase the MOI of the swing. The longer you can keep your hands cocked on the downswing, the faster you can continue to accelerate the trunk turn during those crucial moments from the start of the downswing. High handicap golfers tend to release their hands right from the start of the downswing. They increase the whole inertia of the swing making it very difficult to get it under way. To overcome this heavy swing load, they try to add more torque into the downswing to get it going by forcing the club head all the way through impact. A pro golfer on the other hand maintains that cocked hand angle long after the start of the down swing keeping the swing MOI very low. Their swings have a much higher rate of acceleration without much visible effort involved. That is because they do not need to put much torque into the start of the swing to get it going. They just let the backswing uncoil naturally. It is only as the radius of the swing begins to open up as they release the hands that you see them generate the effort.

 
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